Tom Wambeke

Tom Wambeke

I am currently Senior Programme Officer @ITC-ILO, specializing in innovative educational technology, instructional design, lifelong e-learning, social media and knowledge management.
In this function I advise and assist colleagues, outside customers and partners on learning and knowledge sharing methods and technology, with a focus on information and communication technology for e-learning, blended learning and workplace learning.

This involved in the past running projects and training-of-trainer workshops on networked e-learning, knowledge-sharing and innovation in the following countries or territories: Tanzania, Kenya, Pakistan, Thailand, Jamaica, Peru, Iran, Brazil, Colombia, Canada, Senegal, Zambia, Bénin, Guinée, Namibia, Indonesia, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Nepal, Uganda, Cabo Verde, São Tomé e Príncipe and the Gaza Strip.

Specialties: - adult learning and instructional design (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation) of learning and training activities
- participatory learning methodology
- technology enhanced learning (networked e-learning)
- new technologies (learning content management systems, authoring software and social software )
- participatory knowledge sharing
- social media for development
- training of trainers
- knowledge management
- strategy facilitation
- organizational development

To learn about the future and to see what kind of patterns and trends will affect your strategy it is always useful to rely on scenario planning. A scenario is basically a story that describes a potential future. For learning professionals it can be a powerful method to learn about

Social networks are growing and the labyrinth of social media tools and networks is not always easy to oversee, let be the added value what you can get out of these networks. Therefore we will on a regular base zoom in on some of the specific tools and reflect together

In a training institution more and more activities move beyond the traditional cycle of delivering courses. Learning and training gets closely connected with knowledge sharing and the larger domain of knowledge management. We will take this aspect into account and feed this blog also from this knowledge angle. Two elements

At the start of the new year we want to share with you the annual visitor’s report of this blog about learning and technology. It is available here : http://itcilo.wordpress.com/2011/annual-report/ . After 3 years, almost 60.000 visits and about 100 published articles it’s time to review, upgrade and innovate this knowledge sharing

FAO recently published it’s “E-Learning Methodologies” publication which serves as a guide for designing and developing e-learning courses. More and more it becomes important to focus beyond the mere technological side and understand the importance of instructional design and related processes that are crucial when you want to start with

OHCHR initiated in collaboration with ITC-ILO a coordinated knowledge management approach with the goal of making OHCHR work more effective in the fulfillment of its mandate. Based on a KM needs assessment and a review of KM approaches and practices of UN agencies ITC-ILO developed a knowledge sharing toolkit which

This blog has been updating you in the last two years about the most recent participatory learning methodologies that you can use in a learning context. One question always remained a little bit in the background, and that’s the old simple technique of asking a powerful question. Something you need

The importance of social media is a returning element in a lot of interesting video’s that appear on the internet. It all started with the first version of ‘Did you Know‘ and every now and than we see new inspiring video’s (like the one below) to highlight that social media

A while ago we have mentioned our mobile learning plans at ITC-ILO. We are now happy to share some of the results of the ongoing mobile learning pilots. First of all Jennifer Parker finished her internship at ITC-ILO successfully and published her master thesis on ‘mobile learning for Africa‘. Part

Nowadays, development organizations are increasingly compelled to show that their programmes produce meaningful and lasting changes for their beneficiaries. However, such “impacts” depend on many factors, such as behavioural change by those concerned or the relationships among them. This makes assessing development impacts problematic; yet many organizations strive to measure